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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

4 edition of Some rude & indigested thoughts on the terrible majesty of God in the works of nature found in the catalog.

Some rude & indigested thoughts on the terrible majesty of God in the works of nature

Some rude & indigested thoughts on the terrible majesty of God in the works of nature

particurlarly in the phenomena of earthquakes : occasioned by that memorable earthquake October 29th, 1727...

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Published by Printed and sold by Timothy Green in New London [Conn.] .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Other titlesSome rude and indigested thoughts on the terrible majesty of God in the works of nature ...
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination12 p.
Number of Pages12
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17510712M
OCLC/WorldCa11391792

God said, “Let the earth produce vegetation . Let the earth produce every kind of living creature. ” God said, “Let us make man in our image, in the likeness of ourselves, and let them be masters of the fish of the sea, the birds of heaven, the cattle, all the wild beasts, and all the reptiles that crawl upon the earth. “ —. Michaela Fanie Chaela Neves is on Facebook. Join Facebook to connect with Michaela Fanie Chaela Neves and others you may know. Facebook gives people the power to share and makes the world more open Occupation: Motors Assessor.

Page 16 CHAP. 1. Concerning the external Order and De∣cency of Worship, and the Authority of the Church in such matters. THat I may give a fair Answer to our Pro∣testant Reconciler, I shall first examine some of his Mistakes, which run through his whole Book, and whereon the whole Argu∣ment of his Book is founded; the removing of which, to men of any competent . Full text of "History of Christianity: comprising all that relates to the progress of the Christian religion in "The history of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire," and A vindication of some passages in the 15th and 16th chapters" See other formats.

Such as by God's book are adjudged to death. You four, from hence to prison back again; From thence unto the place of execution: The witch in Smithfield shall be burn'd to ashes, And you three shall be strangled on the gallows. You, madam, for you are more nobly born, Despoiled of your honour in your life, Shall, after three days' open penance. A N Advertisement in the first volume has, in some degree, explained the nature of the present edition. This Preface shall give the history of those which have preceded it. The earliest regular edition was in twelve volumes, 8vo, (reprinted in ), under the respectable name of the late Dr. John Hawkesworth, who thus introduces them: "The Works of Dr. Jonathan Swift were .


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Some rude & indigested thoughts on the terrible majesty of God in the works of nature Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Some rude & indigested thoughts on the terrible majesty of God in the works of nature: particularly in the phaenomena of earthquakes: occasioned by that memorable earthquake Octob. 29th. Wherein earthquakes in their causes, kinds, and astonishing effects, are briefly hinted, enumerated and described.: [Two lines from Newton].

From thoughts of God, people of the time thought of the infinitude of the cosmos and then transferred such thoughts to mountains and oceans on the earth.

In reverse the mountains and oceans raised one’s thoughts to the cosmos and thence to God. Nicolson believed the seventeenth century discovered what she termed, the Aesthetics of the Infinite. This banner text can have markup.

web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. Considered as sources of authentic and of accurate information, the value of the classics is infinitely diminished by this very circumstance; and few, I believe, have studied Mr. Smith’s works (particularly his Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations) without regretting, on some occasions, the omission of his authorities.

The beautifully pathetic strains of this psalm are supposed to have been occasioned by the unnatural rebellion of Absalom against the royal writer of it. And indeed, unhappy parent, thou hadst reason to be cast down, if ever man had, when thine own son was in arms against thee, and had driven thee from Jerusalem, which thy soul loved.

This mere outward service is a worship not conformed to the nature of God. It is not conformed to the commands of God (Proverbs ) 3. It is not conformed to the design of the mission of the Saviour,and the gift of the Holy Spirit.

It is not conformed to the nature of that covenant which is the foundation of our hopes (Jeremiah ) 5. The Book of Mormon on the Existence of God: The Book of Mormon, like the Bible, takes the existence of God as a thing granted; and only in one remembered instance is the question of God's existence argued.

This is in the case of the controversy between Alma, the High Priest, and the desperate Anti-Christ, Korihor. Book 3 - Chapter Of Sanctification - by Herman Witsius The Economy of the Covenants Between God and Man by Herman Witsius Today, many Christians are turning back to the puritans to, “walk in the old paths,” of God’s word, and to continue to proclaim old truth that glorifies Jesus Christ.

The author of that book is supposed to have passed from extreme to extreme; but he has always kept himself in a medium. This charge is not so wonderful. It is in the nature of things, that they who are in the centre of a circle should appear directly opposed to those who view them from any part of the circumference.

He saw it with all the delicate touches rubbed away, His quarrels with act11 shadow, or a vulgar caricature. ors were incessant, because they would take their idea and not his idea of a part. La Rochefoucauld, in his Maxims, gives us a picture, not of human nature, but there —. LIBRARY NOTES.

2 of its selfishness. " works," said Sterling. Excess of worldly cares. The memory is but finite, though capacious, and a superabundance of worldly thoughts within must needs shoulder out better things that should be there.

Surfeiting and drunkenness. These disorder the brain and disable it from its functions (Proverbs ). Violent passions. A multitude of indigested notions. To begin with pride. All the happiness of life is summed up in two articles--pleasing thoughts and pleasing sensations.

Now, pride is founded in self-flattery, and self-flattery is owing to an immoderate desire of entertaining some kind of pleasing thoughts. Another instance of inordinate, ill-conducted self-love is sensuality. With the rude multitude till I return.

Warwick exits through one door; Salisbury and. Commons exit through another. KING HENRY. O Thou that judgest all things, stay my thoughts, My thoughts that labor to persuade my soul.

Some violent hands were laid on Humphrey’s life. If my suspect be false, forgive me, God, For judgment only doth belong to. The repetition also denotes how wanton is the temerity of man: otherwise it would have been enough to have said, once for all, that God approved of his works.

But God six times inculcates the same thing, that he may restrain, as with so many bridles, our restless audacity. But Moses expresses more than before; for he adds m'd, (meod,) that is. A child of God, he hath promises, first-fruits, some beginnings of communion with God here, but he looks for greater things to come.

Well, then, Christ, having disproved the practice of the Pharisees, seeks to set his own disciples right in the management of their prayers, as well as in. a commentary on the book of. genesis. by dr. john gill d.d. based on the king james bible that is a translation from the original tongues; and with the former translations diligently compared.

Part One contains poets' writings on the nature, qualities and purpose of poetry Part Two is a chronological collection of poets' writings on their peers, with an individual entry for each poet. Each extract is presented in modernized spelling and punctuation, and is carefully annotated to provide full explanations of unfamiliar phrases and.

Memorials of the Most Reverend Father in God, Thomas Cranmer sometime Lord Archbishop of Canterbury wherein the history of the Church, and the reformation of it, during the primacy of the said archbishop, are greatly illustrated: and many singular matters relating thereunto: now first published in three books: collected chiefly from records, registers, authentick letters, and.

[1.] Scripture representeth him as such: Danielhe is called the great and dreadful God;’ so DeuteronomyA mighty God and terrible; and NahumA great and terrible God is he:’ and again, JobWith God is terrible majesty.’ [2.] This eminently shineth forth both in his works of creation and providence, (1.).

With the rude multitude till I return. [Exit] Henry VI. O Thou that judgest all things, stay my thoughts, My thoughts, that labour to persuade my soul Some violent hands were laid on Humphrey's life.

If my suspect be false, forgive me, God, For judgment only doth belong to thee. Fain would I go to chafe his paly lips. The Keys to the Gateway of Magic operation, from whence it is called free will: and though it always tends to Good, as an object suitable to it self, yet some times being blinded with error, the.Some stern untutor'd churl, and noble stock Was graft with crab-tree slip, whose fruit thou art, And never of the Nevils' noble race.

WARWICK. But that the guilt of murder bucklers thee, And I should rob the deathsman of his fee, Quitting thee thereby of ten thousand shames, And that my sovereign's presence makes me mild.We must keep fully in mind, however, that this is not due in his view to any inadequacy or ineffectiveness of natural revelation, considered objectively.9 He continues to insist that the seeds of religion are sown in every heart (I.

v. l, ad init.) ; that through all man's corruption the instincts of nature still suggest the memory of God to.